Monday, 25 April 2005

Murdoch's future of journalism (Economist.com) It's nice to see an industry god not succumb to imperialistic hubris. Here's Rupert Murdoch, the biggest media mogul in the world, saying that traditional journalism is dead, and that his industry must adapt or risk more drastic decline. What next? Bill Gates proclaiming that open source software is a bit good, rather than their current stance that it is 'viral'? The Recording Industry of America declaring that they really do need to change if they want to stop piracy, rather than suing their younger (most populous & vulnerable) customers.


I've always felt a certain fear & loathing of the Murdock empire: the right-wing 'balanced viewpoints' of most of his press, the nepotism (elder son runs Fox, younger son runs Sky), and just the plethora of his portfolio - monotheic opinions voiced through many, often obscured, channels. In a profession seeking 'the truth', he seems to control an awful lot of varieties of it. All of which makes this latest speech thoroughly fascinating. Is it merely pandering to popularism, or is it a genuine rallying cry? Does it matter which, as long as it's him saying it? My brief stint in media has taught me one thing: the closer to the top you get, the more people will try to gun you down. Clearly, it's this sort of foresight that has enabled him to survive as long as he has.

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